Homework

Homework and Homework Resources

2/16: read for twenty minutes. (Core 1 and 2) In your composition books, identify with which real American president your character would most relate/most likely vote for and feel represented by. You can do this based on your character's politics, personality, upbringing, personality, or traits. Pick a president who would advance a topic/issue for your character, who would budget for your character's interest, or who just seems similar in some particular way. (Ex: if you have a revolutionary character who wants to change his/her society, you may connect the character to Lincoln; if you have a crafty character who believes in scheming to get ahead, you may vote for Nixon; if you have a charismatic, charming character, you may vote for Kennedy). There are endless possibilities and ways to interpret the presidents based on their policies, politics, reputations, and legacies. Use a SEMR quote to show your character's quality and then explain the connect to the president. For a list of presidents, try: https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/

2/15: read for twenty minutes. (Core 1 and 2) In your composition books, identify the setting of the current section of your book. Introduce, cite, and explain a quote that shows this setting. Remember, setting can be the physical location or can be when your story takes place or the culture around your character. Explain how the setting symbolizes or shows some aspect of the world around your protagonist. Ex: characters hiding in a sewer, a sewer symbolizes the lowliness of the characters, that they are not allowed to mingle and be normal. This adds to the conflict. A comfy home symbolizes love and support and may help your character to solve his/her conflict). Ultimately, show where your setting is and explain how the setting is symbolic and how it impacts the story.

2/14: read for twenty minutes. (Core 1 and 2) In your composition books or on white-lined paper if you can't find your book, identify the point of view of your narrative. This would be 1st person (I/me), 2nd person (you), 3rd omniscent (s/he--you know all characters' feelings/thoughts at any one time), or 3rd limited (s/he--you only know one character's feelings/thoughts throughout the book). Use the quote to show the point of view is correct--do not use dialogue to show point of view! Focus on narrative description that clearly shows what a character is thinking/feeling. Explain how this point of view positively or negatively affects the story's development (ex: adds bias, adds depth to character, etc.). 

2/13: read for twenty minutes. On the sheet of paper passed out in class (or on white-lined paper if you lost it), identify where in the narrative structure you are (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, or denouement/conclusion). Introduce, cite, and explain a quote to show where you are. Predict what would have to happen next to get you to the next step of the narrative structure (example: if you are in the rising action, what would have to happen to get you to the climax? If you are in the climax, what would have to happen to move you into the falling action?).

2/12: read for twenty minutes. On the sheet of paper passed out in class (or on white-lined paper if you lost it), identify a quote with a literary device. This can be any literary device (simile, metaphor, personification, etc., use your two lists if stuck). Explain the quote, the literary device, and the effect of the device on the reader. HINT: if you can't find a literary device, look for imagery (any of the five senses being mentioned/described).

2/10: read for twenty minutes, no written responses if all SEMR responses were done as needed the week prior

2/30-2/9: every night, select one of the four SEMR options to respond to in your composition books. Be sure to introduce, cite, and explain a quote for each response. Each response should be a minimum of three to five sentences. If you lose the sheet with your SEMR options, see me (you will lose a point for requiring an extra). Remember Vocabulary Quiz on 2/8. Poem Due 2/2. Figurative Device Quiz 2/1.

1/23-1/29: every night, select one of the four SEMR options to respond to in your composition books. Be sure to introduce, cite, and explain a quote for each response. Each response should be a minimum of three to five sentences. If you lose the sheet with your SEMR options, the file is below. 1/23 ADDITIONAL H.W.: Complete the vocabulary picture matching. Use your notes.
      RESOURCES
      SEMR H.W. Sheet for 1/23-1/29

1/22: read. Complete any needed reflections to earn SEMR points for completed books. All completed book reflections are due tomorrow to earn full SEMR points for the book. If you are trying to earn points for a book that you are not yet done reading for partial points, read as much as possible and remember to conference during a WIN by Friday.

1/19: read. Book reflections due Tuesday. Quarter ends Friday.

1/18: finish planning for your in-class essay. Complete as much outlining as possible on your own. Plan your claims, support ideas, and evidence. Be sure to have one quote planned for each paragraph and one counterargument somewhere in your paper (this may be a part of a paragraph--a support idea A, B, or C--or this may be a separate paragraph and one of your major claims). Tomorrow using only your notes, outlines, and sources from L.A. and social studies, you will be handwriting your essay to show your growth in research and non-fiction writing.

1/16: 1) write a thesis for your in-class essay on Friday. Ex: American colonists were justified (right and supported) to declare war to break away from Britain because... OR American colonists were not justified (not right and not supported) to declare war to break away from Britain because... 2) Write your three major claims on the roman numerals in the outline at the back of the packet. Ex: Financial, safety/protection, political/governmental, philosophical/basic rights or requirements. 3) Write two support ideas for each claim (you do not need three unless you easily come up with one and you do not need to do sub-detail/evidence yet. Ex: For a financial claim, Stamp Act and Sugar Act may be your two support ideas to justify colonialists. For safety, your two claims may be mob violence and French and Indian War showing that loyalists were more justified. HINT: the key to outlining is to make sure that your claims are as broad as possible. This will allow for more support ideas to fit well within.

1/12: read and outline document 4. You do not need to outline all parts of document 4, though you do need to read all parts. Only outline parts about the three problems that Britain faced. Use formal outlining and include details about what caused the problems and how the problems could be solved. ADDITIONAL NOTES: Truman paper will be printed on Tuesday, so those should be completed. If you are low on SEMR points, be sure to continue reading in your SEMR texts. All SEMR reflections and conferences are due by the end of next week. STUDY FOR YOUR MIDTERM VOCABULARY ON JANUARY 16TH. Use your review packets or go to Useful Links-->Vocabulary to use digital flashcards and games.

1/11: work on Truman paper and taking notes on Document 4. Truman paper will be due end of class tomorrow. Notes will be due on Tuesday.

1/10: Work on Truman paper. Revision for final draft due Friday. Take notes on document 4, due Tuesday.

1/9: Work on Truman paper. Revisions for final draft due Friday.

1/8: Complete the field-trip prep sheet on Greek mythology. Bring in money and permission slip if you have not already.

1/3: read and pick a quote. Complete a full quote analysis with all three steps on which you took notes today. You should have the example written in class for Athene.

1/2: read and assume a character will be dynamic. Create a New Year's resolution for your character. What would s/he change or want to accomplish for the upcoming year and why? Introduce, cite, and explain a quote for why this would be a good New Year's resolution. Also: Field trip $ and form are due Friday. Changes to Truman Paper are due Monday.
          Sentence Starters: For the character _________________, a New Year's Resolution would be...This would be a good resolution because...This idea is demonstrated in the following quote, "..." (Author #). This quote shows...
           Example resolutions: Find my father, be nice to my mother, graduate school, get honors, be  more outgoing, be more confident, stick up for myself, make a new friend, stop a bad behavior, be healthier, etc.

12/21: Finish your career first draft with five full paragraphs. Do the following steps to guarantee the best, most polished version:
           - Use the thesaurus to look up 1-2 words in each paragraph and make a swap to a stronger word.
           - Make sure each body paragraph ends with a rewording of the topic sentence
           - Read out loud to check overall grammar
           - If you have short sentence in a row, combine into complex or compound sentences.
           - Make sure there are transition words between and within paragraphs.

12/20: Read for twenty minutes (SEMR response is not due and will not be graded, but you should be continuing through your books to earn points for the quarter). Core 1: complete your chronological paragraph. You should have three body paragraphs. Core 2+3: use your introduction and conclusion planners/models to complete both an introduction and a conclusion. Come in with a five-paragraph essay about your jobs.

12/19: Read for twenty minutes. Core 1: Write a SEMR response applying one unit 5 vocabulary word to your SEMR text. Introduce, cite, and explain with a quote. Core 2+3: finish your chronological paragraph in the career paper. Explain and elaborate on at least three specifics you can do within the next five to six years to try to achieve this job. Example: what classes may you take in high school (core or specials?), what sports or clubs may you join, what may you do in college or after school in terms of majors or activities?

12/18: Read for twenty minutes (no SEMR response due, but be sure to continue reading in your books so that you are able to finish books and earn points before the end of the quarter). Finish typing your main idea/example paragraph in the career essay. This should be your second body paragraph. Your first paragraph explained why this would be the best job out of three possibilities. This paragraph should explain why you personally would be good at this job and have the required skills. Use examples from your school work or personal life to show that you would be able to do this work. Use your planner and the model paragraph to help.

12/15: Study for literary device quiz. Read for twenty minutes. Introduce, cite, and explain a quote with a literary device. Explain its effect on the reader. For example: A quote with a literary device is, "..." (Last #). This quote shows...The literary device is a _____________ (use the link below or your note sheet/class work) and affects the reader by/because...
Literary device quiz words for Monday

12/14: Read for twenty minutes. Create and explain an inference from the text. Remember there are four types of inference that you can make: text, author, cultural, or universal.

12/12: Read for twenty minutes. In your composition books (white-lined paper if necessary), identify or predict a dynamic character. Introduce, cite, and explain a quote that clearly shows why this is a dynamic character (s/he clearly changed in some way from the beginning of the book) or why this will likely be a dynamic character (predict what about a character will need to change by the end to strengthen the character and overcome conflict). Compare/contrast paragraphs should be done.

12/11: Read for twenty minutes (no SEMR response due, but be sure to keep reading!). Finish your paragraphs started in class comparing and contrasting three possible careers. You should compare the three jobs in one paragraph to determine which is best overall for pay, requirements, and responsibilities. End your paragraph with a clear idea of which one job you will focus on. Use the model paragraph provided for ideas on topic sentences and transitions. You may use those sentences with modifications to fit your paper.

12/8: Read for twenty minutes. Finish all career research (at least 7-10 specifics for each job) and the career interviews. Use outlining format. See below.
I. Job #1
A. Pay
1. #
2. #
B. Responsibilities
1.
2.
3.
C. Requirements
1.
2.
II. Job #2
Repeat above format for notes.
III. Job #3
Repeat above format for notes.

12/7: Read for twenty minutes. Apply a unit 4 vocabulary word to your text in some way. It could be a character trait or conflict. If you can't apply a word, try applying the opposite. For example: The word dictator does not apply to this character because... Be sure to introduce, cite, and explain a quote to show how you are applying your vocabulary word. Study for the vocabulary quiz. Interviews with two adults due Monday.

12/6: Read for twenty minutes. Identify, cite, quote, and explain a quote that demonstrates and creates mood. Explain the mood.

12/5: Find at least three jobs/careers that you want to research further. Due Monday: two interviews with adults over the age of 25 in regard to careers/jobs.

12/4: Read for at least twenty minutes in your SEMR text. Introduce, cite, and explain a quote with one of the literary devices on the review sheet. You can also find this list here and under links/vocabulary. Explain what literary device is in your quote and why it is important. Also, finish bibliographies if needed.
          Link for Literary Device List

12/1: write, plan, and research to complete your first draft with at least five paragraphs for the start of class on Monday. On Monday in class, we will work on transitions and bibliographies. Use the checklist for focus, organization, and elaboration to have a solid first draft. Use your research notes, outline for body paragraphs, and intro and conclusion planning sheets.

11/30: write, plan, and research so that your body paragraphs 1+2 are done and complete. First Draft due Monday.

11/29: write, plan, and research as needed. Have a complete introduction written in the Google doc. First Draft due Monday.

11/28: complete planning as much of your research outline as possible. Do new research as needed to fill in gaps (be sure to copy website into the bibliography section Google Docs). Use all sources available to fill in gaps. 

11/27: review your writing outline for the research paper. Moving left to right and starting with the main claims and supporting ideas, plan at least 1/2 of the spaces. You may need to look through outlines and sources or find new sources. Remember, anytime you write something specific from a source (fact/figure, idea, information, etc.), put the author or organization name immediately after so that you will be able to correctly cite. Not all areas of the outline need to be planned, but plan as much as possible.

11/22: read for at least twenty minutes (hopefully more!). Find a place with indirect characterization (a place where you learn or could make a guess about a character and his/her personality without being directly told-->Ex: dialogue, actions of character, responses of other characters). Introduce and cite this quote. Explain how this quote includes indirect characterization and what you learned about this character. 
Sentence starters: A quote in my book with indirect characterization would be, "..." (Author #). This quote shows that the character is...This is indirect characterization because...

11/21: read for at least twenty minutes. Core 1: Identify a verbal (gerund, participle, or in
infinitive) in the text. Introduce and cite the quote. Explain the type of verbal. Resources: use your notes in the grammar section to review verbal types if needed. Core 2+3: study for verbals quiz. Review study guide, which is included below. Go on NoRedInk, look up Verbals under "Mastery" or topics, and select "QuizMe" or "Practice" to continue reviewing concepts.

         Study Guide
         Study Guide Answers

11/20: read for at least twenty minutes. Identify a verbal (gerund, participle, or infinitive) in the text. Introduce and cite the quote. Explain the type of verbal. Resources: use your notes in the grammar section to review verbal types if needed.

11/17: in your composition book for one page, discuss an answer to the following question: should the United States have dropped the bomb on Hiroshima? You do not need to use quotes, as this is a brainstorming response, but bring up as many reasons and claims as possible. Use your research folders and outlines to come up with your final position on the issue.

11/16: read for at least twenty minutes. Core 2+3: write a response in which you identify a flat character who affects a round character. Introduce, cite, and explain a quote. (flat = one dimensional character with no/little background information and one primary emotion; round = multi-dimensional character with varied background information and many emotions). Core 1: write a response in which you identify a round character. Introduce, cite, and explain a quote that demonstrates this is a round character.

11/15: complete outlines (should be at least half a page for your own source) and complete slides (check rubric attached here, you should be prepare to present your own slides explaining your own source). You should feel ready to explain your learning from your source to the class tomorrow. Be sure to share your outline with me if you haven't.

11/14: read for twenty minutes at least. Identify/predict your primary type of conflict (man v. man, man v. nature, man v. self, man v. society). Introduce, cite, and explain a quote that helps to demonstrate this conflict.

11/13: read for twenty minutes at least. Select any reading strategy of your choice to complete. 

11/10: read and enjoy your books. Finish outlines if they are not done.

11/9: read for twenty minutes at least. Identify the most interesting word (it can be a word you don't know, a word you like the sound of, a word in an interesting place, or just a word that you think is important and want to research further). Introduce, cite, and explain the quote with the interesting word. Look the word up in the Oxford English Dictionary (link: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/pineapple). Explain something interesting that you saw about the word. Explain why you think the author chose this word.
     Model: The author writes, "... (Author #). This quote shows...Something interesting that I learned about this word is...[insert Oxford English Dictionary denotation or connotation]. I think the author picked this word because...

11/7: read for twenty minutes at least. Identify the most important verb that you read. Introduce, cite, and explain the quote. Explain why you felt that this was the most important verb.
     Model: The author writes, "I keep pedaling" (Cormier 11). The word "keep" is the most important verb because the narrator is trying to keep it together, both physically and emotionally. He is falling apart and doesn't seem to have much, like a caring family, but he is determined to "keep" going, which shows his character traits. That he is trying to "keep" himself together but probably won't succeed is also his conflict.

11/6: read for twenty minutes at least. Complete the second column of the part of speech review sheet, filling in fifteen words total, at least one in each box (except interjection--you may skip that box if you do not see one). STUDY FOR PART OF SPEECH TEST! Use study guide from class--that will be the test format. Go to the resources below to help study if you are struggling. Use your notes and the below resources to help study.
      RESOURCES
      Quizlet for grammar terms: https://quizlet.com/96756307/grammar-part-of-speech-review-only-flash-cards/
      Study Guide Blank and Answers for Terms
      Study Guide Blank and Answers for Application
      Common linking verbs: 
am, is, are, was, were, being, been, appear, become, feel, grow, look, remain, seem, smell, sound, stay, taste, and turn.

      Helping verbs: 
am, is, are, was, were, be, being, been, have, has, had, do, does, did, could, should, would, can, shall, will, may, might, must

      Common prepositions: 

about
above
across
after
against
around
at
before
behind
below
beneath
beside
besides
between
beyond
by
down
during
except
for
from
in
inside
into
like
near
of
off
on
out
outside
over
since
through
throughout
till
to
toward
under
until
up
upon
with
without


11/3: read for twenty minutes at least. Complete one column of the part of speech review sheet, filling in fifteen words total, at least one in each box (except interjection--you may skip that box if you do not see one). Start studying for part of speech test.

11/2: study for vocabulary test (know fifteen vocabulary words and twelve prefixes). Read for twenty minutes at least. Find one sample word your author uses that utilizes a prefix from your study list for tomorrow. Cite the sentence with this word and explain what the word means and how it uses the prefix. Show that you found a prefix and know what the prefix means. If you truly don't see a prefix (you should!), pick a sample word of your own using a prefix that your author could have used and explain why you picked that word and how it uses the prefix.
        Example: "...the cap was perfect" (Palacio 16). The word "perfect" uses the prefix "pre," which means that the cap thoroughly met his needs.

11/1: read for twenty minutes at least. Continue studying for the vocabulary test on Friday and the part of speech test on Tuesday. After reading, pick a sentence with at least six words to quote and cite in your composition book. Write the part of speech over every word. If you get stuck, use a dictionary or Google to find the common part of speech usage for the word.

10/27: read for twenty minutes at least. Pick any character. Based on this character's personality, traits, and book decisions, if the character were to walk into a modern-day Halloween store to pick out an appropriate Halloween costume for him/her, what costume would he or she select and why? Use one quote to explain the choice.

10/26: read for twenty minutes at least. While reading, look carefully for the use of a verbal (a verb-related word that is NOT acting as the verb). This will be an -ing, -ed, or -en word that is not the main action of the sentence. If you truly cannot find one after reading for twenty minutes, make your own sentence with a verbal and explain the verbal's use. You should see many examples, however. Once you find one you like, quote the sentence and briefly explain what kind of verbal (gerund/noun or participle/adjective) you see in the sentence. Review class notes and examples in your L.A. Grammar section for examples.
Example: "...she kept farting" (Palacio 6). "Farting" is a gerund because it is a direct object and comes right after "kept." OR "...the farting nurse put her very big arms on Mom..." (Palacio 7). "Farting" is a participle because it is modifying "nurse," which is a noun.

10/25: read for twenty minutes at least. Pick a five-or-more word sentence and write it in your composition book with a citation. Over each word, write the part of speech. I recommend you do these in the following order: Nouns, Adjectives (they modify nouns), Verbs (what are your nouns doing?), Adverbs (when/how do your verbs happen), conjunctions (where do you join new elements?), Prepositions (bridges to nouns), and Interjections (emotional interruptions). If you are stuck on a word, Google the word's definition for help.

10/24: read for twenty minutes at least. Apply one vocabulary word to your SEMR text. Explain the connection using a quote.
Sentence Starters: The vocabulary word that best applies is...because...A quote to show this is, "..." (Last #). This quote shows...

10/23: read for twenty minutes at least. Write a questioning response, something that you would ask the author. Use the sentence starters below to help. You must connect a related quote to the question and explain why you would ask that question. You do not have to answer the question. STUDY: active reading test on Friday, vocabulary test next Tuesday, part of speech and verbal test next Friday.

10/20: read for twenty minutes at least. Write a questioning response. Use the sentence starters given in class (also below). For questions, consider a question that you would ask the author.
Sentence starters: A question that I would ask is...because...A related quote would be, "..." (Last #). This quote shows...

10/19: read for twenty minutes at least. Write how one of your unit 3 vocabulary words applies to your reading; think about how a word may apply to a character, tone, mood, setting, conflict, etc. Follow the prompt suggestions on your previous vocabulary application paper (you received this back in class if you did it before the last quiz). Also, STUDY FOR YOUR VOCABULARY QUIZ! Prefixes and vocabulary words!
Sentence starters: The vocabulary word that best applies to my text is...I picked this word because...A quote to show this would be, "..." (Last #). This quote shows...This connects to the vocabulary word because...

10/16: read for twenty minutes at least. Write a connection response. Follow the sentence starters below to help if needed. 

10/13: read for twenty minutes at least. Write a connection response. This is described and modeled in your active reading strategy booklet. If you can't find your booklet, think about a part in your text that you connect to or relate to. This can be a feeling that you've had or a similar situation (most of you will connect to a feeling, probably not the same type of situation. Example: a time when you have felt betrayed or scared or proud). Give a quote to show the part of the text that you connect to, then explain your connection (can be  a personal experience, book, movie, etc.), then explain how this helps you to understand the text better. Sentence starters: I connected to the part where...The quote to show this is, "..." (Author #). This quote shows...My connection to this quote is...This helped me to understand better that...[connect back to original text].

10/12: read for twenty minutes at least. Chose a reading strategy response to complete in your composition book (prediction, visualization, or clarifying). Study for your active reading strategy quiz tomorrow. Review the study guide completed in class or look through your composition book. For the quiz, you will read an excerpt and write three responses--prediction, visualizing, and clarifying. 

10/11: read for twenty minutes at least. Complete a last clarifying response. Look at recommendations below. Look at previous responses with comments. Look at booklet with models and active reading checklists and steps. Quiz on Friday for all three strategy types. Finish NoRedInk review of parts of speech.

10/6: read for twenty minutes at least. Complete a clarifying response. 1) What is an area that could be clearer--this could be something the author does not explain well or a good discussion question. 2) What quote lead you to this question or helps you answer it? 3) Attempt to clarify by giving at least one possible answer to the question. NOREDINK part of speech review pathway due by the end of class on Wednesday. Continue work on it as needed.

10/5: read for twenty minutes. Apply one vocabulary word from your unit 2 list. Complete the SEMR sheet given out in class (look back at the previous version of this that you did for unit one for ideas). Study for the vocabulary quiz.

10/3 and 10/4: Read for twenty minutes. Complete a prediction response in your composition book (look at your active reading strategies booklet and your previous three responses for prediction--Quiz on visualization / prediction / clarifying next Thursday). Sentence starter for prediction: After reading, I predict...I predict this based on, "..." (Author #). This quote shows...which led me to predict that...This would bring me to the (exposition / rising action / climax / falling action / denouement or conclusion) because...

9/29 and 10/2: Read for twenty minutes. Complete a visualization response in your composition book (look at your active reading strategies booklet and your previous three responses for visualization--Quiz on visualization/prediction/clarifying on Oct. 10). Sentence starter for visualization: While reading, I pictured...I pictured this because of the quote, "..." (Author #). This quote shows...This helped me to better understand the (conflict/character/author's craft-->Pick one) because...

9/28: Read for twenty minutes. Pick one sentence with at least five words from your text. For this sentence, over each word, write the possible part of speech over the word (n., v., adj., adv., interj., conj., prep.). If you are stuck with a word, Google or look up in the dictionary to determine the common part of speech for the word. STUDY for the part of speech quiz. There is extra practice with answers provided below. Remember there are notes in your grammar section and links for Quizlet.
       RESOURCES
       Extra Practice with Answers

9/25-9/28: Read for twenty minutes. Complete a clarifying response. Basically, ask a discussion question about something in the text that you could explore further or have elaborated on or better explained. Use a quote to show this. Give a possible answer to your discussion question or try to explain for yourself a possible answer to this element that could be clearer. You should always be able to ask questions while reading, even if you understand the material. Consider why/how characters are doing what they are doing or why/how the author is focusing on what s/he is focusing on. Use your active reading strategy booklet for models and ideas. Core 1: use the template reviewed in class.

9/22: Read for twenty minutes. Core 1: identify and write in your composition book one word that you do not know. If you know all of the words, write down a word that you like. Be prepared to share in class. Core 2: identify and write in your composition book one word that you do not know and write a definition. If you know all of the words, pick a word that you like and explain why you like it. 

9/21: Read for twenty minutes. Study for the vocabulary quiz (it will be open note with resources). Core 2 + 3, complete the vocabulary half sheet you received in class.

9/20: Read. Complete the third column for parts of speech. Categorize fifteen words. Try to put at least one in each box.

9/19: Read. Complete a prediction response. 

9/18: Read. Complete a prediction response. 

9/15: Read. Complete a prediction response.

9/14: STUDY FOR QUIZ and read at least twenty minutes. While reading, fill in one column on the part of speech sheet, just like for the ​Jurassic Park​ model column. Categorize at least fifteen words in the column in the correct part-of-speech category. Include page numbers. Every word in the book should fit in one of the boxes. Do your best to put it in the correct box. There are links for practice on Google Classroom and on Resources on this page.

9/13: read at least twenty minutes. While reading, fill in one column on the part of speech sheet, just like for the ​Jurassic Park​ model column. Categorize at least fifteen words in the column in the correct part-of-speech category. Include page numbers. Every word in the book should fit in one of the boxes. Do your best to put it in the correct box.

9/9-9/12: read at least twenty minutes every night and then complete one visualization response. Use the model book that you received for active reading strategies. Use an intro quote, quote, and citation with at least three sentences addressing the strategy.

9/5-9/9: read at least twenty minutes every night and then complete one question from the below list. Answer a different question every night. Responses should be in your composition books. If you do not have your composition books, you may write it on any paper, but if you do not have your composition book to submit with it in class, you will lose one point.
        RESOURCES
        Homework Week One

8/30: due Friday, parent or guardian signature page showing that an adult reviewed the course description, NoRedInk letter, and adult-level slip. Parents may contact me if there are questions. Only the first signature is required showing that a parent reviewed the description and knows to contact me about questions.
RESOURCES
Description
NoRedInk Letter for Parents
NoRedInk Presentation for Parents

 

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